OECD Perceived Health Status Statistics

$79 / year

This dataset contains perceived health status statistics for countries members of OECD (The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) and countries in accession negotiations with OECD. The perceived health status data cover periods from 1980 to 2015.

Complexity

The dataset is provided by OECD (The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) whose mission is to promote policies that will improve the economic and social well-being of people around the world. OECD’s work is based on continued monitoring of events in member countries as well as outside OECD area, and includes regular projections of short and medium-term economic developments. The OECD Secretariat collects and analyses data, after which committees discuss policy regarding this information, the Council makes decisions, and then governments implement recommendations. The OECD Health Datasets offers the most comprehensive source of comparable statistics on health and health systems across OECD countries. It is an essential tool to carry out comparative analyses and draw lessons from international comparisons of diverse health systems. The Eurostat database is the main data source for all European countries. Time series are also completed with national data for selected years.

There is not yet full standardization of the measurement of perceived health status across OECD countries. In Europe, a standard health interview survey instrument has been recommended to measure this variable. The recommendation is described in the publication: “Health Interview Surveys: Towards International Harmonization of Methods and Instruments,” World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe, 1996. The question for perceived health status is “How is your health in general?” and answer options are: very good, good, fair, bad or very bad. In dataset it is specified where there is a difference from methodology. At the same time the primary data sources for perceived health status by income level The data sources are generally health or household surveys. Starting from this the perceived health status is the percentage (crude rate) of population of 15 years old or older who report their health to be good or very good (excellent, or all positive response categories), fair (not good, not bad), bad or very bad (all negative response categories). For the perceived health status according to age and gender or according to socioeconomic characteristics (education or income level) is the percentage (crude rate) of population of 15 years old or older who report their health to be good or very good (excellent, or all positive response categories).

Education level is expressed by the highest completed level of education, defined according to the latest International Standard Classification of Education, ISCED-2011. Low education means: early childhood education (ISCED 0), primary education (ISCED 1) and lower secondary education (ISCED 2). The medium education level comprises upper secondary education (ISCED 3), post-secondary non-tertiary education (ISCED 4). High education means: short-cycle tertiary education (ISCED 5), bachelor’s or equivalent level (ISCED 6), master’s or equivalent level (ISCED 7), doctoral or equivalent level (ISCED 8). If the income primary data comes from health survey the individuals’ income will be used to assign them to income quintiles. If data come from household surveys and relate to household income equivalisation of income for persons within households should take place. A common method divides household income by the square root of the household size.

Breaks in the time-related continuity of data on which the calculated indicators values are based are specified in the content of the dataset.

Date Created

2017-06-30

Last Modified

2017-06-30

Version

2017-06-30

Update Frequency

Irregular

Temporal Coverage

1980-2015

Spatial Coverage

OECD Members and Partners Countries

Source

John Snow Labs => The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development

Source License URL

John Snow Labs Standard License

Source License Requirements

N/A

Source Citation

N/A

Keywords

OECD Health Statistics, OECD Health Indicators, OECD Countries, WHO Health Interview Surveys, Perceived Health Status, Perceived Health By Age, Perceived Health By Gender, Perceived Health By Socioeconomic, Perceived Health By Education Level, Perceived Health By Income Level

Other Titles

OECD Countries And Partners Perceived Health Status Statistics, OECD Perceived Health Status By Demographic Characteristics

Name Description Type Constraints
YearThe year corresponding to the indicator value calculated by gender, age and socioeconomic characteristicsdaterequired : 1
CountryThe name of the country member of OECD or in accession negotiations with OECDstringrequired : 1
Country_AbbreviationThe abbreviated name of the country member of OECD or in accession negotiations with OECDstringrequired : 1
Country_StatusSpecifies if the country is member of OECD or has an accession agreement with OECDstringenum : Array required : 1
IndicatorSpecifies whether the perceived health status is very good/good or fair or bad/very badstringenum : Array required : 1
Indicator_CodeThe original OECD code used for the indicator, gender, age and socioeconomic characteristicsstringrequired : 1
GenderThe gender of the population group for which the value of the indicator is calculatedstringenum : Array required : 1
AgeThe age of the population group for the estimated value of indicator is calculatedstringenum : Array required : 1
Education_Or_Income_LevelSpecifies the population group for which the value of indicatorstringrequired : 1
Percent_Of_PopulationThe indicator value for the specified age, gender and socioeconomic characteristicsnumberrequired : 1 level : Ratio
Is_Data_Time_Related_BreaksSpecifies if there are breaks in the time-related continuity of databooleanrequired : 1
Is_Difference_In_MethodologySpecifies whether the methodology used to collect the primary data was the one recommended by WHObooleanrequired : 1
YearCountryCountry_AbbreviationCountry_StatusIndicatorIndicator_CodeGenderAgeEducation_Or_Income_LevelPercent_Of_PopulationIs_Data_Time_Related_BreaksIs_Difference_In_Methodology
2013ChileCHLOECD memberGood or very good healthSRHSMGHAMalesAge 15-24All education and income levels82.3truetrue
2013ChileCHLOECD memberGood or very good healthSRHSMGHBMalesAge 25-44All education and income levels73.2truetrue
2013ChileCHLOECD memberGood or very good healthSRHSMGHCMalesAge 45-64All education and income levels53.1truetrue
2009ChileCHLOECD memberGood or very good healthSRHSMGHAMalesAge 15-24All education and income levels86.5truetrue
2009ChileCHLOECD memberGood or very good healthSRHSMGHBMalesAge 25-44All education and income levels70.0truetrue
2009ChileCHLOECD memberGood or very good healthSRHSMGHCMalesAge 45-64All education and income levels55.8truetrue
2015ChileCHLOECD memberGood or very good healthSRHSMGHAMalesAge 15-24All education and income levels82.4falsetrue
2015ChileCHLOECD memberGood or very good healthSRHSMGHBMalesAge 25-44All education and income levels72.3falsetrue
2015ChileCHLOECD memberGood or very good healthSRHSMGHCMalesAge 45-64All education and income levels49.8falsetrue
2004ItalyITAOECD memberGood or very good healthSRHSMGHAMalesAge 15-24All education and income levels93.0truefalse