US Bureau Of Labor Statistics Injury And Illness Data By Industry

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This dataset contains non-fatal injury and illness data by industry from US Bureau of Labor Statistics for 2016. The industries are classified according to the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).

Complexity

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities (IIF) program, provides annual information on the rate and number of work-related injuries, illnesses, and fatal injuries, and how these statistics vary by incident, industry, geography, occupation, and other characteristics. These data are collected through the Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII) and the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI).

The Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII) is a Federal/State program in which employer’s reports are collected annually from approximately 200,000 private industry and public sector (State and local government) establishments and processed by State agencies in cooperation with the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Survey estimates are based on a scientifically selected sample of establishments, some of which represent only themselves but most of which also represent other employers of like industry and workforce size that were not chosen to report data in a given survey year. Summary information on the number of injuries and illnesses is transcribed by these employers directly from their recordkeeping logs to the survey questionnaire.

Injuries and illnesses logged by employers conform to definitions and recordkeeping guidelines set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor. Under OSHA guidelines, non-fatal cases are recordable if they are occupational injuries or illnesses which involve lost work time, medical treatment other than first aid, restriction of work or motion, loss of consciousness, or transfer to another job. Employers record injuries separate from illnesses and also identify for each whether a case involved any days away from work or days of restricted work activity, or both, beyond the day of injury or onset of illness. Occupational injuries, such as sprains, cuts, and fractures, account for the vast majority of all cases that employers log and report to the BLS survey. Occupational illnesses are new cases recognized, diagnosed, and reported during the calendar year. Overwhelmingly, reported illnesses are more often acute cases that are easier to directly relate to workplace activity (e.g., contact dermatitis or carpal tunnel syndrome), as opposed to long-term latent illnesses, such as cancers. The latter illnesses that generally would not be known until well after survey data for a particular year have been collected are believed to be under-recorded and, thus, understated in the BLS survey.

For each survey, the sample used is one of many possible samples, each of which could have produced different estimates. The variation in the sample estimates across all possible samples that could have been drawn is measured via the sampling error, which is presented for the SOII as the percent Relative Standard Error (RSE). To calculate the 95-percent confidence interval given the percent RSE from a SOII estimate:

– Divide the percent RSE by 100 and multiply the result by the SOII estimate to determine the standard error
– Multiply the standard error by 1.96 to determine the Margin Of Error (MOE)
– The SOII estimate plus or minus the MOE is the 95-percent confidence interval

The 95-percent confidence interval is the interval centered on the sample-based estimate and includes all values within 1.96 times the estimate’s standard error. If several different samples were selected to estimate the population value (such as an injury and illness incidence rate), the 95-percent confidence interval would mean that one would be 95-percent certain that the range of these sample-based estimates would include the true population value.

The dataset contains four measures used to assess the phenomenon of occurrences of injuries and illnesses among workers by industry. Below is listed the four measures:

– Percent relative standard errors for rates of non-fatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry
– Percent relative standard errors for numbers of non-fatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry
– Incidence rates of non-fatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry and case types
– Numbers of non-fatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry and case type (thousands)

It is necessary to mention that days-away-from-work cases include those that result in days away from work with or without job transfer or restriction.

Data for Mining (Sector 21 in the North American Industry Classification System — United States, 2012) include establishments not governed by the Mine Safety and Health Administration rules and reporting, such as those in Oil and Gas Extraction and related support activities. Data for mining operators in coal, metal, and nonmetal mining are provided to BLS by the Mine Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. Independent mining contractors are excluded from the coal, metal, and nonmetal mining industries. These data do not reflect the changes the Occupational Safety and Health Administration made to its recordkeeping requirements effective January 1, 2002; therefore, estimates for these industries are not comparable to estimates in other industries.

Data for employers in railroad transportation are provided to BLS by the Federal Railroad Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation.

Relative standard errors were not calculated for mining, except oil and gas (NAICS 212), and rail transportation (NAICS 482).

The incidence rates represent the number of injuries and illnesses per 100 full-time workers.

Date Created

2017-11-09

Last Modified

2019-11-07

Version

2019-11-07

Update Frequency

Annual

Temporal Coverage

2016

Spatial Coverage

United States

Source

John Snow Labs; United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics;

Source License URL

Source License Requirements

N/A

Source Citation

N/A

Keywords

Bureau of Labor Statistics, Industry Classification, Non Fatal Injuries, Non Fatal Illnesses, Recordable Cases, Recordable Incidence Rate, Lost Time Injury, Lost Time Illness, Cases With Job Transfer, Cases With Work Restriction

Other Titles

US Non Fatal Injuries And Illness Statistics By Industry, US Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses By Industry

NameDescriptionTypeConstraints
North_American_Industry_Classification_2012The denomination of the sector, subsector, group, industry or detailed industry (specific to US) according to 2012 NAICSstringrequired : 1
North_American_Industry_Classification_Codes_2012The 2012 NAICS code, of 2-digit for sector, 3 for subsector, 4 for group, 5 for industry or 6 for the detailed industry (specific to US)integerlevel : Nominal
Classification_Hierarchical_LevelSpecifies if the denomination and code corresponds to sector, subsector, group, industry or detailed industry (specific to US)stringrequired : 1
MeasuresOne of the four measures listed in description for which data is provided by BLSstring-
Total_Recordable_CasesThe measure is or is based on the total number of injuries and illnesses, OSHA recordablenumberlevel : Ratio
Cases_With_Days_Away_From_WorkThe measure is or is based on the number of recordable cases with days away from worknumberlevel : Ratio
Cases_With_Job_Transfer_Or_RestrictionThe measure is or is based on the number of recordable cases with job transfer or restrictionnumberlevel : Ratio
Total_With_Days_Away_From_Work_Or_Job_Transfer_Or_RestrictionThe measure is or is based on the number of recordable cases with days away from work, job transfer or restriction; is the sum of values from the previous two columnsnumberlevel : Ratio
Other_Recordable_CasesThe measure is or is based on the number of recordable cases that are not associating days away from work or job transfer or restriction; is the difference of total number recordable cases and number of cases with days away from work, work transfer or restrictionnumberlevel : Ratio
Is_Divided_By_1000Specifies if the number of cases is divided by 1,000boolean-
Is_Excludes_FarmsSpecifies if the cases from farms with fewer than 11 employees were not used to estimate the number of recordable casesboolean-
North American Industry Classification 2012North American Industry Classification Codes 2012Classification Hierarchical LevelMeasuresTotal Recordable CasesCases With Days Away From WorkCases With Job Transfer Or RestrictionTotal With Days Away From Work Or Job Transfer Or RestrictionOther Recordable CasesIs Divided By 1000Is Excludes Farms
All industries including private, state and local governmentIndustry sectorPercent relative standard errors for rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry0.50.71.10.60.7FalseTrue
Private industryIndustry sectorPercent relative standard errors for rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry0.60.81.20.70.7FalseTrue
Goods-producingIndustry subsectorPercent relative standard errors for rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry1.31.42.91.61.5FalseTrue
Natural resources and mining,Industry groupPercent relative standard errors for rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry10.84.126.812.79.0FalseTrue
Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting11.0Industry sectorPercent relative standard errors for rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry11.84.828.714.29.5FalseTrue
Crop production111.0Industry subsectorPercent relative standard errors for rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry4.76.86.34.98.6FalseTrue
Oilseed and grain farming1111.0Industry groupPercent relative standard errors for rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry24.433.029.834.7FalseTrue
Vegetable and melon farming1112.0Industry groupPercent relative standard errors for rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry8.611.515.510.314.6FalseTrue
Fruit and tree nut farming1113.0Industry groupPercent relative standard errors for rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry7.711.310.17.715.1FalseTrue
Greenhouse, nursery, and floriculture production1114.0Industry groupPercent relative standard errors for rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry7.812.910.68.613.3FalseTrue